Communicants


I believe that the phrase “obligatory reading” is a contradiction in terms; reading should not be obligatory. Should we ever speak of “obligatory pleasure”? What for? Pleasure is not obligatory, pleasure is something we seek. Obligatory happiness! We seek happiness as well. For twenty years, I have been a professor of English Literature in the School of Philosophy and Letters at the University of Beunos Aires, and I have always advised my students: If a book bores you, leave it; don’t read it because it is famous, don’t read it because it is modern, don’t read a book because it is old. If a book is tedious to you, leave it, even if that book is Paradise Lost - which is not tedious to me - or Don Quixote - which also is not tedious to me. But if a book is tedious to you, don’t read it; that book was not written for you. Reading should be a form of happiness, so I would advise all possible readers of my last will and testament - which I do not plan to write - I would advise them to read a lot, and not to get intimidated by writers’ reputations, to continue to look for personal happiness, personal enjoyment. It is the only way to read.
Jorge Luis Borges
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I believe that the phrase “obligatory reading” is a contradiction in terms; reading should not be obligatory. Should we ever speak of “obligatory pleasure”? What for? Pleasure is not obligatory, pleasure is something we seek. Obligatory happiness! We seek happiness as well. For twenty years, I have been a professor of English Literature in the School of Philosophy and Letters at the University of Beunos Aires, and I have always advised my students: If a book bores you, leave it; don’t read it because it is famous, don’t read it because it is modern, don’t read a book because it is old. If a book is tedious to you, leave it, even if that book is Paradise Lost - which is not tedious to me - or Don Quixote - which also is not tedious to me. But if a book is tedious to you, don’t read it; that book was not written for you. Reading should be a form of happiness, so I would advise all possible readers of my last will and testament - which I do not plan to write - I would advise them to read a lot, and not to get intimidated by writers’ reputations, to continue to look for personal happiness, personal enjoyment. It is the only way to read.

Jorge Luis Borges


New To Me Movies: September

Guardians of the Galaxy (James Gunn, 2014)

Crooklyn (Spike Lee, 1994)

Mo’ Better Blues (Spike Lee, 1990)

Les Vampires (Louis Feuillade, 1915-1916)

Judex (Georges Franju, 1963)

Fantômas I: À l’ombre de la guillotine (Louis Feuillade, 1913)

L’Assassin habite au 21 (Henri-Georges Clouzot, 1942)

Foreign Correspondent (Alfred Hitchcock, 1940)

He Who Gets Slapped (Victor Sjöström, 1924)

The Thief of Bagdad (Raoul Walsh, 1924)

Juve contre Fantômas (Louis Feuillade, 1913)

Le mort qui tue (Louis Feuillade, 1914)

Fantômas contre Fantômas (Louis Feuillade, 1914)

Le faux magistrat (Louis Feuillade, 1914)

The Last Command (Josef von Sternberg, 1928)

Master of the House (Carl Th. Dreyer, 1925)

The Big Parade (King Vidor, 1925)

I Don’t Want To Be A Man (Ernst Lubistch, 1918)

Apart From You (Mikio Naruse, 1933)

J’accuse (Abel Gance, 1919)

People On Sunday (Curt Siodmak, Robert Siodmak, Edgar G. Ulmer and Fred Zinnemann, 1930)

Body and Soul (Oscar Micheaux, 1925)

Friday (F. Gary Gray, 1995)

The Ministry of Fear (Fritz Lang, 1944)

The Big Heat (Fritz Lang, 1953)

The Giver (Phillip Noyce, 2014)

Scarlet Street (Fritz Lang, 1945)

Laura (Otto Preminger, 1944)

Dr. Mabuse the Gambler (Fritz Lang, 1922)

Night Train to Munich (Carol Reed, 1940)

Out of the Past (Jacques Tourneur, 1947)

A Hen in the Wind (Yasujiro Ozu, 1948)

Rich Hill (Andrew Droz Palermo and Tracy Droz Tragos, 2014)

Red River (Howard Hawks, 1948)

Sweet Smell of Success (Alexander Mackendrick, 1957)

16 Acres (Richard Hankin, 2012)

Brothers and Sisters of the Toda Family (Yasujiro Ozu, 1941)

Woman of Tokyo (Yasujiro Ozu, 1933)

Scattered Clouds (Mikio Naruse, 1967)

Humanity and Paper Balloons (Sadao Yamanaka, 1937)

Here’s to the Young Lady (Keisuke Kinoshita, 1949)

The Sacrament (Ti West, 2014)

Black Sunday (Mario Bava, 1960)

Movies watched in 2014: 367


gemielicious said: "is your name in reference to [some obscure artsy fartsy film]?" "nope, it’s actually in reference to [some other obscure artsy fartsy film."

*Drops monocle in martini glass in shock at suggestion that Winter Light  is obscure* *Wipes up spill with old copies of The New Yorker*

My girlfriend and I had trouble deciding whether to watch Jaws or Psycho II. We didn’t watch Jaws, and I don’t regret our decision.